Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

June 18-24, 2011

Species

  • Overview

  • The symposium will focus on 24 species of wild carnivores in six families: Viverridae (8 species), Mustelidae (7), Felidae (5), Herpestidae (2),Prinonodontidae (1), Mephitidae (1). These are all the native, extant, Bornean carnivores except the Sun Bear. Among the 24 species 11 are listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, with four being classified as Endangered and seven as Vulnerable. Furthermore two species, the Collared Mongoose and the endemic Bornean Ferret Badger, are currently listed as Data Deficient in the latest Red List (IUCN 2010). At least three species are endemic to the island of Borneo.

  • Family: Viverridae (8 species)

  • Hose's Civet

    © WCS Malaysia

    Hose's Civet

    Diplogale Hosei

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    This species is endemic to Borneo and little is known about its distribution. The few available records are mainly from higher hill and montane forest, but occasional lowland records suggest that it is more flexible in its habitat selection. Its adaptability to degraded areas and resilience to hunting is entirely unknown. All that can be said so far is that it has a peculiarly patchy distribution, probably relating to some natural habitat factor.

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  • Otter Civet

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Otter Civet

    Cynogale Bennettii

    IUCN Red List: ENDANGERED

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    The Otter civet has a Sundaic distribution (Thai/Malay Peninsular, Sumatra and Borneo). As a semiaquatic species it is thought to be almost confined to lowland areas close to water resources, with some records from plateaux. Throughout southeast Asia these areas have suffered the highest degradation rates, putting this species under considerable threat.

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  • Banded Civet

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Banded Civet

    Hemigalus Derbyanus

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: MODERATE

    Similar to the Otter Civet, the Banded Civet has a Sundaic distribution. Based on available records it is thought this species is confined to the ground under closest canopy, mainly in lowland forests. This species might be more sensitive to forest disturbance than most small carnivores as its abundance seems lower in more disturbed forests.

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  • Binturong

    © J. Ross & A.J. Hearn

    Binturong

    Arctictis Binturong

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    The Binturong is widespread in southeast Asia. Binturongs are primarily arboreal, but do descend to the ground. Within its range, the binturong is confined to tall forest, and although the species have been recorded in secondary forests its responses to forest disturbances are poorly understood. There is also strong suggestive evidence that it is more susceptible to hunting than are most other small carnivores.

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  • Small-toothed Palm Civet

    © WWF Malaysia

    Small-toothed Palm Civet

    Arctogalidia Trivirgata

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: MODERATE

    The small-toothed palm civet range covers parts of the Sundaic region and northern Southeast Asia. Even more than the binturong this species is strictly arboreal and mainly nocturnal. Due to this behaviour this species is often overlooked by traditional wildlife surveys focusing on camera-trapping and day-transect surveys and it appears to be rare than it truly is on Borneo. However spotlight surveys indicate that this species might be able to occur also in more disturbed or small areas of forest.

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  • Masked Palm Civet

    © J. Ross & A.J. Hearn

    Masked Palm Civet

    Paguma larvata

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: MODERATE

    The masked palm civet has a large distribution in south, east and southeast Asia and is known from wide altitudinal range across this huge area. Based on the few more intensive camera-trapping studies in Borneo, it seems that the Masked Palm Civet might be more abundant at higher elevations than in the lowlands.

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  • Malay Civet

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Malay Civet

    Viverra Tangalunga

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: LOW

    The Malay Civet has a Sundaic distribution including the Phillippines and Sulawesi. It is one of the few Bornean carnivores known to occur in degraded forests, at the boundaries of oil palm plantations as well as in closed-canopy forests. Especially on Borneo, where it is allopatric with its closest relatives the Small-Indian Civet, Large-spotted Civet and the Large Indian Civet, it seems to be widespread nd common and occurring in stable numbers.

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  • Common Palm Civet

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Common Palm Civet

    Paradoxurus Hermaphroditus

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: LOW

    This species has a widespread distribution in central, south and southeastern Asia. Similar to the Malay civet the Common Palm Civet is higher tolerant of habitat modifications and has been recorded feeding on palm oil fruits and on fruiting trees close to houses, and living within urban centers.

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  • Family: Mustelidae (7 species)

  • Hairy-nosed Otter

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Hairy-nosed Otter

    Lutra Sumatrana

    IUCN Red List: ENDANGERED

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    This species is endemic to southeast Asia and is known only to occur in a few localities. It is unknown if this species still occurs on Borneo until it was rediscovered recently. It is mainly known from freshwater swamps in lowland areas, but due to the low number of records almost nothing is known about this species. From the only recent Bornean record it seems able to be sympatric with the two other Bornean otter species confirmed for Borneo, the Asian Small-clawed Otter and the Smooth-coated Otter.

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  • Eurasian Otter

    © Duplaix

    Eurasian Otter

    Lutra Lutra

    IUCN Red List: NEAR THREATENED

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    Although the Eurasian otter has one of the widest distributions of all Palaearctic mammals, it is unknown if the Eurasian Otter historically and currently occurred on Borneo. A reassessment of the Eurasian Otter on Borneo is urgently needed.

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  • Asian Small-clawed Otter

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Asian Small-clawed Otter

    Aonyx Cinereus

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    The Asian Small-clawed Otter has a large distribution, extending from India and throughout southeast Asia to Palawan in the Philippines. The typical habitats of the Asian Small-clawed Otter are wetland systems containing pools and stagnant water or slow-flowing lowland streams. Similar to other wetland specialists (Flat-headed Cat, Otter Civet and other otter species), the Asian Small-clawed Otter is threatened by the loss of lowland habitat.

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  • Smooth-coated Otter

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Smooth-coated Otter

    Lutrogale Perspicillata

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: MODERATE

    The Smooth-coated Otter is distributed throughout south Asia and southeast Asia. Generally, it uses large rivers and lakes, peat swamp forests, mangroves and estuaries, and even uses rice fields for foraging. Compared with some other regions within its range, almost nothing is known about the occurrence of Smooth-coated Otters from Borneo.

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  • Malay Weasel

    © J. Ross & A.J. Hearn

    Malay Weasel

    Mustela Nudipes

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    This species has a Sundaic distribution but is not found on Java, for which it has erroneously been reported. It is reported outside forests and to higher elevations and in general seems ecologically plastic. Although it is a ground-dwelling species, it is only rarely photographed in camera-traps, possibly an artifact of camera-traps being deployed for other species.

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  • Yellow-throated Marten

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Yellow-throated Marten

    Martes Flavigula

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: LOW

    The Yellow-throated Marten has an Asian and Sundaic distribution. This species is found in forests (primary and secondary) and sometimes in adjacent habitats across a wide elevational range. The Yellow-throated Marten is primarily diurnal.

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  • Bornean Ferret Badger

    © Wilting, Sabah Parks

    Bornean Ferret Badger

    Melogale Everetti

    IUCN Red List: DATA DEFICIENT

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    This species is endemic to Borneo and from the few known records it seems confined to the region in and around Kinabalu National Park and Crocker Range National Park in Sabah, Malaysia. This species is considered to be montane as no reliable records exist from lowland areas. Nothing is known about the Bornean ferret badger population status or size within the massif.

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  • Family: Felidae (5 species)

  • Bornean Bay Cat

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Bornean Bay Cat

    Pardofelis Badia

    IUCN Red List: ENDANGERED

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    Found only on the island of Borneo, where its distribution is poorly known due to a few but increasing number of recent records. Records range from the lowlands to highland forests and although it has been recorded in secondary forests, recent research has suggested it prefers primary or closed-canopy forests. This species likely occurs at low densities throughout its range.

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  • Flat-headed Cat

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Flat-headed Cat

    Prionailurus Planiceps

    IUCN Red List: ENDANGERED

    BCS Priority: MODERATE*

    * This species is rated MODERATE due to its recent assessment. Click here for details.

    The Flat-headed Cat has a restricted distribution to the Sundaic region. Recent research helped to understand the potential distribution of this species and supported earlier accounts which described this species as confined to lowland areas close to water resources. As with other wetland species, the Flat-headed Cat is adversely affected by habitat loss.

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  • Sunda Clouded Leopard

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Sunda Clouded Leopard

    Neofelis Diardi

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    Only recently distinguished as a distinct species from its mainland southeast Asia relatives (Neofelis nebulosa), this species is confined to the islands of Borneo and Sumatra. The Sunda Clouded Leopard is known to occur in a various habitats from primary to secondary forests and from lowland to upland forests. Sunda Clouded Leopards seem have large territories and are believed to occur at low densities. Large continuous forest blocks are considered necessary to protect this species.

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  • Marbled Cat

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Marbled Cat

    Pardofelis Marmorata

    IUCN Red List: VULNERABLE

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    The Marbled Cat is found from the Himalayan foothills to the Russian Far East, to the Sunda Islands Borneo and Sumatra. Compared with the other Bornean cats, the Marbled Cat may be more arboreal and therefore considered forest-dependent. Records come from primary and secondary forests and from lowlands to montane forests. In contrast to the other Bornean cat species the Marbled Cat appears to be primarily diurnal.

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  • Leopard Cat

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Leopard Cat

    Prionailurus Bengalensis

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: LOW

    The leopard cat is a widespread species in Asia occurring from Afghanistan to all major Sunda Islands. The Leopard Cat is one of the few carnivore species which adapt well to anthropogenic disturbances and they might even benefit from more open habitats on Borneo. Although they are reported to occur in oil palm plantations, they most likely require some neighbouring forested areas.

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  • Family: Herpestidae (2 species)

  • Collared Mongoose

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Collared Mongoose

    Herpestes Semitorquatus

    IUCN Red List: DATA DEFICIENT

    BCS Priority: HIGH

    The Collared Mongoose is found on Borneo and Sumatra, but only a few museum specimens from Sumatra seem to exist and the species's current status there is unknown. Although the number of records of Collared Mongooses on Borneo has increased in recent years with an increasing number of camera-trapping studies, almost nothing is known about its distribution and ecology.

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  • Short-tailed Mongoose

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Short-tailed Mongoose

    Herpestes Brachyurus

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: LOW

    The Short-tailed Mongoose has a Sundaic distribution including parts of the Philippines. Especially on Borneo it is known to tolerate habitat modifications and occurs in primary as well as disturbed forests. Although there are records from oil palm plantations, it is unknown if the mongooses can survive only in plantations, or if they also require adjacent forests.

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  • Family: Prinonodontidae (1 species)

  • Banded Linsang

    © J. Ross & A. J. Hearn

    Banded Linsang

    Prionodon Linsang

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: MODERATE

    This species has a Sundaic distribution from southern Myanmar and Thailand to all three major Sunda Islands. This species has been recorded from undisturbed and disturbed forests, but its nocturnal and primarily arboreal behaviour has likely limited its detection by a number of studies.

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  • Family: Mephitidae (1 species)

  • Sunda Stink-badger

    © Wilting & Mohamed, Sabah Wildlife Department & Sabah Forestry Department

    Sunda Stink-badger

    Mydaus Javanensis

    IUCN Red List: LEAST CONCERN

    BCS Priority: MODERATE

    This species, one of only two in the skunk family found outside the Americas is found on the three major Sunda Islands Borneo, Sumatra, and Java. It is found in primary and secondary forests and open areas such as gardens adjacent to forests. Although there are more incidental records available for this species than most other Bornean carnivores, its distribution on Borneo remains little understood because the records have not been synthesised for decades and the species has never been studied directly. Recent surveys suggest some odd gaps in this species distribution.

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